Virgin Base Oil SN150 is the most common type of oil used in lubrication products today, and sets the standard for oil quality. Virgin oil is crude oil that’s gone through the refining process, but hasn’t been used yet. Once you use it in your machines, it’s downgraded to used oil.

Recycled Oil
When it comes to recycling your oil, this refers to taking used oil and running it through a filtration system to remove any insoluble impurities. This won’t remove any chemical contaminants, but removing the physical ones can make it suitable to be burned as fuel or re-used in non-critical systems.

Reconditioned oil is a subcategory of recycled oil, where recycled oil is mixed with additives to help prolong its usable life. Reconditioned oil is typically only good for a one-time use however, and not suitable in automobiles.

One of the most important factors is the liquid’s viscosity at various temperatures. Whether or not a crude oil is suitable to be made into a base oil is determined by the concentration of base oil molecules as well as how easily these can be extracted.

Base oil is produced by means of refining crude oil. This means that the crude oil is heated in order that various distillates can be separated from one another. During the heating process, light and heavy hydrocarbons are separated – the light ones can be refined to make petrol and other fuels, while the heavier ones are suitable for bitumen and base oils.

There are large numbers of crude oils all around the world that are used to produce base oils. The most common one is a type of paraffin crude oil, although there are also naphthalene crude oils that create products with better solubility and very good properties at low temperatures. By using hydrogenation technology, in which sulfur and aromatics are removed using hydrogen under high pressure, you can obtain extremely pure base oils, which are suitable when quality requirements are particularly stringent.

Base oil SN500 is defined as a light grade base oil at the upper end of the specifications for Grade I base oils. They are mainly used in lubricant production. It is a Group I base oil which has undergone solvent refining and de-waxing processes. To finish the refining it was hydrogen treated to clear out any impurities.